Buttermilk Biscuits

 

Buttermilk Biscuits

 

Still in search of the perfect buttermilk biscuits. These ones are the best so far. Served with honey, cinnamon butter in honor of Texas Roadhouse. Which for some reason is still the best roll and and honey cinnamon butter combination I’ve had at a restaurant. Don’t you agree? These biscuits are big, soft, and have just the perfect crumb to them. Biscuits are also far easier to make than rolls, but I hardly think to do it. Not to mention, I’ve made a few hard and dry biscuits in my time, so sometimes I worry they will turn out like that again. But never fear, we’ve practiced these over and over and they turn out perfect every time!

 

What Can You Substitute For Buttermilk?

For each cup of buttermilk, you can use 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice plus enough milk to measure 1 cup.

Or, you can also use 1 cup of plain yogurt or 1-3/4 teaspoons cream of tartar plus 1 cup milk.

 

What Is The Difference Between Cake Flour And All-Purpose?

Cake flour is a finely milled, delicate flour with a low protein content.

Cake flour is usually bleached.

 

How Long Will Buttermilk Biscuits Keep?

Buttermilk biscuits will keep for days at room temperature.

They should be covered or stored in a plastic storage bag.

 

Buttermilk Biscuits

Buttermilk Biscuits

Buttermilk Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 Cup Cake flour
  • 2 Teaspoons Baking powder
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1 Teaspoon Sugar
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Salt
  • 8 Tablespoons (1 stick) Cold Unsalted butter, cut into 1/4 inch cubes
  • 3/4 Cup Cold buttermilk, or 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons plain yogurt

Instructions

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle and heat to 450.
  2. Place the flours, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt in a large bowl or food processor fitted with a metal blade.
  3. Whisk, or process ingredients together.
  4. Cut in the butter until it resembles coarse meal with a few slightly larger bumps.
  5. Stir in buttermilk with a rubber spatula or fork until it forms a soft, slightly sticky ball.
  6. In a food processor, remove cover and pour in buttermilk evenly over flour.
  7. Process until it forms moist clumps.
  8. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and quickly form into a rough ball. Be careful to not overmix.
  9. Using a sharp knife, divide the dough into quarters and then each quarter into thirds.
  10. Quickly and gently shape into a rough ball.
  11. Place on ungreased baking sheet (this can be refrigerated for up to 2 hours)
  12. Bake until tops are light brown, 10-12 min.

Notes

Recipe from the cookbook, The Best New Recipe, from the editors of Cooks Illustrated ~Quick note, I received this book for my birthday last year from some wondeful friends and it's pretty much the best. So, go buy yourselves one!~

Nutrition Information:

Serving Size:

1 recipe

Amount Per Serving:Calories: 1896 Saturated Fat: 0g Cholesterol: 268.1mg Sodium: 0mg Carbohydrates: 217.3g Fiber: 5.7g Sugar: 13.6g Protein: 31.5g
 

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Carrian Cheney

Lover of all things beautiful, good and delicious. Wife, mother, friend, foodie.

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4 comments on “Buttermilk Biscuits”

  1. I am going to have to try this out. I don’t have that cookbook, but I have seen it and wanted it!
    MY hubby loves his biscuits.

    • The instructions have you knead the dough? That seems odd to me I think of bsicuits as a quickbread, which means no kneading. I’d think the kneading would make them tough. I find the addition of an egg odd, too, though, so perhaps the Bob’s Red Mill mix is just a totally different biscuit concept.I recently used the Smitten Kitchen recipe for Cream Biscuits (via James Beard) as a cobbler topping, replacing the cream with 1 cup of milk, which makes it too gooey for rolling but perfect for blopping onto fruit. Instead of dipping the dough, I poured the melted butter over the top. With a squirt of lemon or a spoon of vinegar to sour the milk (like Kathy c recommended), I think that the Smitten Kitchen recipe with 3/4 cup soured milk would work well for buttermilk-type bsicuits.

  2. Yummy! you made these and didnt invite me over. haha! JK! They look delicious!!

  3. That is totally my favorite recipe for biscuits. LOVE THEM. I’m so glad you got that book for your birthday. It’s also one of my faves.